new york allows same-sex marriage

the bill passed today. monumental.
read about it here, in the new york times

It is now by far the largest state to grant legal recognition to same-sex weddings, and one that is home to a large, visible and politically influential gay community. Supporters of the measure described the victory in New York as especially symbolic — and poignant — because of its rich place in the history of gay rights: the movement’s foundational moment, in June 1969, was a riot against police at the Stonewall Inn, a bar in the West Village.

and for more information on gay rights & the stonewall inn with views/news/interviews/&propoganda from the 1960/70s, check out the pbs documentary Stonewall Uprising:

WGBH American Experience . Stonewall Uprising | PBS.

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Fresh, Local, Indie Food Rave; it’s “Civil Disobedience on a Paper Plate”

from carlah
via NYT

it’s an underground, night time food market that lets people get into eating and selling really good food, without the hastle of a permit. how? by becoming a “club” instead of a market. lucky for everyone, it’s free to join.

the article tackles many side of the idea; DIY meets locavores, underground movement, the realization that we need to make money to keep doing what we love to do, direct sales from chefs to consumers and growers to buyers, “cottage food” and culinary start ups.

full story here.

The underground market seeks to encourage food entrepreneurship by helping young vendors avoid roughly $1,000 a year in fees — including those for health permits and liability insurance — required by legitimate farmers markets. Here, where the food rave — call it a crave — was born, the market organizers sidestep city health inspections by operating as a private club, requiring that participants become “members” (free) and sign a disclaimer noting that food might not be prepared in a space that has been inspected.

the bee crisis

guest post, by carlah

While browsing the New York Times for more info on France’s dealings with GMOs I stumbled across this article from November. The subject is curious and presents a whimsical and goofy caper: Brooklyn bees and their honeycombs mysteriously turning red. It’s immediately evident in the article, however, that the implications of this occurrence are actually rather disheartening. The foraging worker bees who should have had amber “honey stomachs” were instead sporting a “garish bright red” and producing concoctions “reminiscent of cough syrup.” The culprit of this deviation from the natural status quo? Dell’s Maraschino Cherry Company.

One can read the incident as a quirkily accidental allusion to the underlying issues of the food industry today. The bees’ preference for the mass produced artificial sweet nectar is shocking: “Shouldn’t they know better? Or, perhaps, not know enough to know better?” Which inevitably begs the question: why is our own willfull consumption of and acceptance of the abundance of genetically engineered and chemically based food not equally disheartening?

Though this article is, by now, a few months out of date in the realm of current events I thought it was worth sharing and poignant seeing as how awareness of bee crisis is gaining momentum. On a cultural level, this can be largely attributed to the upcoming documentary due to drop this spring. I, personally, am a total follower and advocate of Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva as preachers in the food movement church.

Check out “Queen of the Sun” on itunes: http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/independent/queenofthesun/ and remember, without the bees making pollination happen we’ll all be forced to eat Maraschino factory fruit.

rock paper scissors

if a computer can be built to mimic human reasoning, how well can people predict how a computer will predict that human?

in a game of first to 20, i won 20-25-15.
can you predict how a computer will predict what you will throw next? if so, does that make you smarter, or the computer simply predictable. when will the computer be able to predict your read of it predicting you? and what will that mean for the future of computers and people?

click the image to try your luck.

cell phones and brains

“The study is important because it documents that the human brain is sensitive to the electromagnetic radiation that is emitted by cellphones,” Dr. Volkow said. “It also highlights the importance of doing studies to address the question of whether there are — or are not — long-lasting consequences of repeated stimulation, of getting exposed over five, 10 or 15 years.”

whole article here, thank you new york times