the story of the high line

robert hammond tells the tale of how new york saved the High Line and created a park in the sky

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the hole

via bldgblog:

A neighborhood in Brooklyn known as “The Hole” is thirty feet below sea level. It is so close to the water table, in fact, that local homes are not connected to the city’s sewer system, relying instead on cesspools; the streets—with names like Ruby, Emerald, and Sapphire—are often flooded, on the verge of permanently returning to marshland. The Hole is a short documentary by Courtney Sell and Billy Feldman about this neighborhood; cowboys on horseback wander through water-logged streets while abandoned housing developments soak up rain like giant sponges.

the bee crisis

guest post, by carlah

While browsing the New York Times for more info on France’s dealings with GMOs I stumbled across this article from November. The subject is curious and presents a whimsical and goofy caper: Brooklyn bees and their honeycombs mysteriously turning red. It’s immediately evident in the article, however, that the implications of this occurrence are actually rather disheartening. The foraging worker bees who should have had amber “honey stomachs” were instead sporting a “garish bright red” and producing concoctions “reminiscent of cough syrup.” The culprit of this deviation from the natural status quo? Dell’s Maraschino Cherry Company.

One can read the incident as a quirkily accidental allusion to the underlying issues of the food industry today. The bees’ preference for the mass produced artificial sweet nectar is shocking: “Shouldn’t they know better? Or, perhaps, not know enough to know better?” Which inevitably begs the question: why is our own willfull consumption of and acceptance of the abundance of genetically engineered and chemically based food not equally disheartening?

Though this article is, by now, a few months out of date in the realm of current events I thought it was worth sharing and poignant seeing as how awareness of bee crisis is gaining momentum. On a cultural level, this can be largely attributed to the upcoming documentary due to drop this spring. I, personally, am a total follower and advocate of Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva as preachers in the food movement church.

Check out “Queen of the Sun” on itunes: http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/independent/queenofthesun/ and remember, without the bees making pollination happen we’ll all be forced to eat Maraschino factory fruit.

fixers collective

out with the flu, but now i’m fixed

so on the subject of fixing, i just found out about the Fixer’s Collective today, in new york. you bring something, they fix it. why? because so many things that break aren’t really broken, are they? no, usually it’s just one tiny piece gone bad, but we throw the whole thing out anyways…

“Fixers’ Collective is a social experiment in improvisational fixing and mending.”
Check it out HERE, there’s a little video and everything!

conductor

Alex Chen has turned the iconic 1972 NYC subway map (by Massimo Vignelli)…

Massimo Vignelli NYC subway map

…into a piece of visual and musical art, called, “Conductor”.

Some of the routes have changed. All of the lines fade out over time. But the general idea is that the trains move by the minute according to their schedule over a 24 hour period, and when one crosses over another, it creates a sound, as if each line were a string being plucked. Full description here.

See a video of the program in motion below, then go to mta.me for an interactive version of the map-strument.