the bee crisis

guest post, by carlah

While browsing the New York Times for more info on France’s dealings with GMOs I stumbled across this article from November. The subject is curious and presents a whimsical and goofy caper: Brooklyn bees and their honeycombs mysteriously turning red. It’s immediately evident in the article, however, that the implications of this occurrence are actually rather disheartening. The foraging worker bees who should have had amber “honey stomachs” were instead sporting a “garish bright red” and producing concoctions “reminiscent of cough syrup.” The culprit of this deviation from the natural status quo? Dell’s Maraschino Cherry Company.

One can read the incident as a quirkily accidental allusion to the underlying issues of the food industry today. The bees’ preference for the mass produced artificial sweet nectar is shocking: “Shouldn’t they know better? Or, perhaps, not know enough to know better?” Which inevitably begs the question: why is our own willfull consumption of and acceptance of the abundance of genetically engineered and chemically based food not equally disheartening?

Though this article is, by now, a few months out of date in the realm of current events I thought it was worth sharing and poignant seeing as how awareness of bee crisis is gaining momentum. On a cultural level, this can be largely attributed to the upcoming documentary due to drop this spring. I, personally, am a total follower and advocate of Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva as preachers in the food movement church.

Check out “Queen of the Sun” on itunes: http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/independent/queenofthesun/ and remember, without the bees making pollination happen we’ll all be forced to eat Maraschino factory fruit.

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2 thoughts on “the bee crisis

  1. Hey, thanks for the info. I have a very close family member who shall remain nameless (except that she is 90 years old). She loves to eat maraschino cherries, especially soaked in bourbon. I think we will forgive her since she is 90 years old — and I never touch them myself!

  2. Pingback: cell phones kill bees | things you might probably find interesting

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